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Customer Questions & Answers

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Showing 11-20 of 39 questions
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Answer:
I don't know because I had to throw the boots away after only five months as the soles started coming off. They were really comfortable boots, but the quality is appalling. I wrote a review of them saying this. That's probably more than you asked for in your question, but I think people have to know when the quality is… see more I don't know because I had to throw the boots away after only five months as the soles started coming off. They were really comfortable boots, but the quality is appalling. I wrote a review of them saying this. That's probably more than you asked for in your question, but I think people have to know when the quality is poor. I hope this helps. see less I don't know because I had to throw the boots away after only five months as the soles started coming off. They were really comfortable boots, but the quality is appalling. I wrote a review of them saying this. That's probably more than you asked for in your question, but I think people have to know when the quality is poor. I hope this helps.
william robinson
· 08 November 2020
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Answer:
Just above the ankle bone
Stephen Spencer
· 30 January 2021
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Answer:
Nah mate. Kids at school are cruel... especially when those less fortunate can’t be ‘hip’ like others. Sad really. I’m disabled, and needed a walking boot I can get into easily, that keep my feet dry. Hitec are a decent make for walking boots. Great for my needs, comfy, and keep my feet warm and dry and easy to get on.… see more Nah mate. Kids at school are cruel... especially when those less fortunate can’t be ‘hip’ like others. Sad really. I’m disabled, and needed a walking boot I can get into easily, that keep my feet dry. Hitec are a decent make for walking boots. Great for my needs, comfy, and keep my feet warm and dry and easy to get on. I opted for Hitec as they suited my needs, although I could’ve bought whatever brand I wanted to. They were my own personal choice.
Great question though. Better suited to the playground, don’t you think? 😉 see less
Nah mate. Kids at school are cruel... especially when those less fortunate can’t be ‘hip’ like others. Sad really. I’m disabled, and needed a walking boot I can get into easily, that keep my feet dry. Hitec are a decent make for walking boots. Great for my needs, comfy, and keep my feet warm and dry and easy to get on. I opted for Hitec as they suited my needs, although I could’ve bought whatever brand I wanted to. They were my own personal choice.
Great question though. Better suited to the playground, don’t you think? 😉

Kevin Holland
· 16 January 2021
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Answer:
They are about the right size . I ordered 10 and take a 10 and they are a good fit. Best for you to get 9 as they have room to tighten the laces more, or just two pairs of socks!
Amazon Customer
· 19 May 2021
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I can't understand why. I've walked and climbed many miles in mine and not had any trouble.
David M.
· 16 August 2021
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Answer:
Amazon prices perminately changing dependent on the number of views and purchases. It’s just the luck of the draw I am afraid. Annoying but prices are flued
Rev Glyn Dew
· 19 May 2021
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Answer:
Return them!
Rev Glyn Dew
· 19 May 2021
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Answer:
I’m a size 43 and got a 44.
Perfectly comfortable with normal or thick socks - not the best for their alleged waterproofness - good for damp conditions but not for extreme conditions.

Bob D
· 06 January 2021
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Answer:
The Consumer Rights Act 2015
The Consumer Rights Act sets out your rights when you're buying products, services and digital content.
see more
The Consumer Rights Act 2015
The Consumer Rights Act sets out your rights when you're buying products, services and digital content.

Product quality - what should you expect?
As with the Sale of Goods Act, under the Consumer Rights Act all products must be of satisfactory quality, fit for purpose and as described.

The rules also include digital content in this definition. So all products - whether physical or digital - must meet the following standards:

Fit for purpose The goods should be fit for the purpose they are supplied for, as well as any specific purpose you made known to the retailer before you agreed to buy the goods.
As described The goods supplied must match any description given to you, or any models or samples shown to you at the time of purchase.
Satisfactory quality Goods shouldn't be faulty or damaged when you receive them. You should ask what a reasonable person would consider satisfactory for the goods in question. For example, bargain-bucket products won’t be held to as high standards as luxury goods.
One aspect of a product being of satisfactory quality is durability, in other words how long it lasts.

Durability takes into account many different factors like product type, brand reputation, price point and how it is advertised. For example you're unlikely to be able to claim a cheap kettle that's stopped working after four years isn't durable. Whereas a more premium and expensive kettle that's been well looked after and has stopped working after 14 months could be considered to not be durable, and therefore not of satisfactory quality.

Are you returning a faulty product?
Make a faulty goods complaint
You could be entitled to a repair, replacement or a refund, answer some simple questions and Which? can help you start your complaint for free.

Start my letter
Problem with a new or used car? Find out your rights
Who should you claim against?
If what you’ve bought doesn’t satisfy any one of the three criteria outlined above, you have a claim under the Consumer Rights Act.

If you've bought a faulty product, you can read our guide, which shows you what you should do and how to make a claim.

If you want to make a claim under the Consumer Rights Act, you have several possible ways of resolving your issue, depending on the circumstances and on how you want the retailer to remedy the situation.

Your rights under the Consumer Rights Act are against the retailer – the company that sold you the product – not the manufacturer, so you must take any claim to the retailer.

What you can claim depends on how much time has passed since you physically took ownership of the goods.

How long do you have to return a faulty product?
The Consumer Rights Act gives you the legal right to either get a refund for goods that are of unsatisfactory quality, unfit for purpose or not as described, or get it repaired - depending on how long you've owned it:

0 - 30 days you can claim a full refund for goods that are of unsatisfactory quality, unfit for purpose or not as described.
30 days - six months you must give the retailer one opportunity to repair or replace it before you can claim a refund
six months or more you must give the retailer one opportunity to repair or replace it before you can claim a partial refund, and the burden of proof is on you to prove the product is faulty
If you'd prefer a repair or replacement in the first 30 days you can ask the retailer, but it cannot refuse to give you a refund.

The 30 day right to a refund doesn't apply to products you've bought as downloads - such as music, games or apps. You can, however, ask for a digital product to be repaired or replaced if it develops a fault. And if this isn't possible, or unsuccessful, you have the right to get a price reduction - which could be the full amount you paid. see less
The Consumer Rights Act 2015
The Consumer Rights Act sets out your rights when you're buying products, services and digital content.

Product quality - what should you expect?
As with the Sale of Goods Act, under the Consumer Rights Act all products must be of satisfactory quality, fit for purpose and as described.

The rules also include digital content in this definition. So all products - whether physical or digital - must meet the following standards:

Fit for purpose The goods should be fit for the purpose they are supplied for, as well as any specific purpose you made known to the retailer before you agreed to buy the goods.
As described The goods supplied must match any description given to you, or any models or samples shown to you at the time of purchase.
Satisfactory quality Goods shouldn't be faulty or damaged when you receive them. You should ask what a reasonable person would consider satisfactory for the goods in question. For example, bargain-bucket products won’t be held to as high standards as luxury goods.
One aspect of a product being of satisfactory quality is durability, in other words how long it lasts.

Durability takes into account many different factors like product type, brand reputation, price point and how it is advertised. For example you're unlikely to be able to claim a cheap kettle that's stopped working after four years isn't durable. Whereas a more premium and expensive kettle that's been well looked after and has stopped working after 14 months could be considered to not be durable, and therefore not of satisfactory quality.

Are you returning a faulty product?
Make a faulty goods complaint
You could be entitled to a repair, replacement or a refund, answer some simple questions and Which? can help you start your complaint for free.

Start my letter
Problem with a new or used car? Find out your rights
Who should you claim against?
If what you’ve bought doesn’t satisfy any one of the three criteria outlined above, you have a claim under the Consumer Rights Act.

If you've bought a faulty product, you can read our guide, which shows you what you should do and how to make a claim.

If you want to make a claim under the Consumer Rights Act, you have several possible ways of resolving your issue, depending on the circumstances and on how you want the retailer to remedy the situation.

Your rights under the Consumer Rights Act are against the retailer – the company that sold you the product – not the manufacturer, so you must take any claim to the retailer.

What you can claim depends on how much time has passed since you physically took ownership of the goods.

How long do you have to return a faulty product?
The Consumer Rights Act gives you the legal right to either get a refund for goods that are of unsatisfactory quality, unfit for purpose or not as described, or get it repaired - depending on how long you've owned it:

0 - 30 days you can claim a full refund for goods that are of unsatisfactory quality, unfit for purpose or not as described.
30 days - six months you must give the retailer one opportunity to repair or replace it before you can claim a refund
six months or more you must give the retailer one opportunity to repair or replace it before you can claim a partial refund, and the burden of proof is on you to prove the product is faulty
If you'd prefer a repair or replacement in the first 30 days you can ask the retailer, but it cannot refuse to give you a refund.

The 30 day right to a refund doesn't apply to products you've bought as downloads - such as music, games or apps. You can, however, ask for a digital product to be repaired or replaced if it develops a fault. And if this isn't possible, or unsuccessful, you have the right to get a price reduction - which could be the full amount you paid.

Peter G.
· 27 May 2021
  • 0
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    votes
Answer:
Usually if the page shades out if the size isn’t available in that colour/design.
R. Knight
· 30 July 2021