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Tora! Tora! Tora!

 (2,534)
7.52 h 24 min1970U
Events from the American and Japanese perspectives leading up to and including the Japanese aerial attack on the U.S. Naval base in pearl harbor on December 7, 1941.
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More details

Supporting actors
Joseph CottenE.G. Marshall
Studio
Fox
Purchase rights
Stream instantly Details
Format
Prime Video (streaming online video)
Devices
Available to watch on supported devices

Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars

2534 global ratings

  1. 79% of reviews have 5 stars
  2. 13% of reviews have 4 stars
  3. 7% of reviews have 3 stars
  4. 1% of reviews have 2 stars
  5. 0% of reviews have 1 stars
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Top reviews from the United Kingdom

Johnny B GoodeReviewed in the United Kingdom on 09 April 2019
5.0 out of 5 stars
One of the best historical recreations
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I've watched this film several times and still find it watchable.

It is one of the best historical recreations of war that I have seen. One excellent feature is it shows things from both sides the Japanese as well as the USA. It shows the Japanese as divided and Yamato as being forced into a situation where he has to plan for a war he does not wish to fight. It also shows the shortcomings within the American military and that despite having broken the Japanese code and having warning of an impending attack they failed to adequately prepare. Bearing in mind that the film was made in 1970 it still bears up well against the later and in my opinion atrociously bad 'Pearl Harbour'. The film gives in my view a balanced view showing both sides of the conflict.
7 people found this helpful
J. McDonaldReviewed in the United Kingdom on 06 November 2017
5.0 out of 5 stars
Tora! Tora! Tora!
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This is still one of the best and most impressive American war films ever made, presenting an honest, balanced and historically faithful depiction of the attack on Pearl Harbor that brought the USA into the war.

It fares quite well on today's large-size digital TV screens; I originally saw it in the cinema and – as you'd expect - it was pretty spectacular, with breathtaking flying sequences which still retain their thrill even on the reduced scale.
A long film (cinemas had an intermission in the middle) it has quite a preamble before the real action starts; unusually for Hollywood it takes a rather documentary-styled approach which helps concentrate the storyline on what matters rather than some romantic interest or character development; indeed, at the time mainly less well-known actors were cast to retain an ensemble feel to the film and avoid any fixation on stars.
It is also historically balanced, giving a lot of time to the Japanese side of the events; the evocative carrier take-off scenes at dawn are some of the most memorable and visually striking aerial footage outside of authentic wartime archives.
A great deal of consideration was also given to the authenticity of the production with carefully modified aircraft and clever mock-ups standing in for the types used in the period.
It certainly still outclasses Michael Bay`s behemoth “Pearl Harbor” (2001) which seems outrageously hokey next to this, despite all it`s CGI special effects.

A very fine movie that has aged well and still engrosses as a viewing experience.
The standard DVD release is as listed above in the product description and it delivered a sharp and satisfactory picture on my own TV.
16 people found this helpful
ZydorReviewed in the United Kingdom on 05 March 2017
5.0 out of 5 stars
Superb, balanced, well made factual movie, that is hard to significantly critise;
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.... there is hardly more to be said about this film, other than to reinforce what has been said already with very (VERY) few dissenting voices. Its about as factually correct as you are going to get from a Hollywood movie that's made for profit, not historical reference and accuracy.
Best plan with this film, is sit back and immerse yourself into the plot lines and self evident skills at all levels and types displayed; never mind the interminable beat for best comment blah blah. Just view and enjoy a superbly made film, as factual as you are going to get for a commercial Hollywood movie, that is about one of the Iconic events of the 20th Century.
11 people found this helpful
SGCReviewed in the United Kingdom on 15 September 2021
5.0 out of 5 stars
Impressive for half-century old material...
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I always have my fingers crossed these days when I decide to upgrade to a Blu Ray from an existing standard DVD.
This time it was worth it.
It is not up to modern Blu ray standards, it would be ridiculous to expect that. But for film stock over 50 years old this BR version is, in my view, impressive.
The visuals are a bit variable, but always better than standard DVD, and often very, very good.
But even more than the visuals is the sound quality. I would say it is right up there with the best.
Well worth the upgrade cost if you like this film.
My 5 stars in this case would be for the BR conversion and the film - a true classic, even being based on historical facts doesn't make it clunky.
Just for reference - so you know what I'm viewing with, I have a high-end 4K OLED TV, a Sony 4K BR player and listen through a Yamaha AV receiver and good 5.1 speakers. Just to contextualise!
Anglian TravellerReviewed in the United Kingdom on 25 August 2014
5.0 out of 5 stars
Fox’s $25million 1970 spectacular is well-served by Blu-Ray, with the extended Japanese cinema release as a bonus
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‘Tora Tora Tora’ cinema-released in 1970 is beyond dispute the best film ever made about the Japanese Navy’s December 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor, incomparably superior to the juvenile, toe-curling 2001 embarrassment ‘Pearl Harbor’ directed by Michael Bray and ‘starring’ (if such a word can be used) the unfortunate Ben Afflick.

TTT adopts a meticulous documentary style and tells the story from both US and Japanese perspectives in two separate and eventually interlocking narratives, deploying a large cast of characters but no obvious ‘stars’ to focus the sympathies of the audience. The Japanese viewpoint is told by Japanese actors speaking Japanese and directed by Toshio Masuda and Kinji Fukasaku (Akira Kurosawa was initially engaged for the job, but worked too slowly and proved too much of a control freak, so was replaced). The American narrative is directed by Richard Fleischer. Caution: the first two thirds of the film may not appeal to viewers seeking only the excitement and titillation of combat action scenes, as the 18-month diplomatic build-up to the Japanese attack is chronicled with intelligence and fine detail. This background however serves to build the tension for the final reel very effectively, and places the action against a deeper perspective.

The scene of the actual attack lasts only 30-minutes, but soaked up the majority of the film’s $25million budget, an unprecedented cinematic extravagance in 1970. As other reviewers have pointed out, there was no CGI in 1970: real aircraft and real ships were used (or the next-best thing: realistic 50-foot scale replicas). Mock dogfights were flown by real pilots in real vintage P40s and AT6 Texans ‘enhanced’ to make them as close as possible in appearance to Japanese naval aircraft, and the carnage on the USN capital ships and the USAAF bases during the attack was created with real explosions and real danger to the stuntmen, several of whom were killed or injured during the filming. This long air-raid scene still looks absolutely stunning and utterly convincing, though being 1970 you don’t see the horrific injuries detailed close-up as you might in a more recent production such as Spielberg’s ‘Saving Private Ryan’.

Due to this profligacy of spend on visual spectacle, TTT didn’t break even for the studio on initial release but the film’s reputation has grown over the years. It’s a movie with a script so intelligent, with a narrative so well-crafted and edited, that you can watch it again and again and each time gain a deeper understanding of the complex historical perspective. The only mild criticism levelled at the film is that the Japanese treachery is whitewashed to a degree, with Hirohito’s direct culpability airbrushed out as he was at the time of filming still constitutional monarch in the by-then reconstructed and democratic Japan, and this criticism does hold merit but does not take away from the power of the film.

The 2012 Blu-Ray from Fox Searchlight is the best-ever release of TTT, with astounding image clarity and sharp detail. You get both the original 136-minute English-language theatrical release with Japanese dialogue subtitled, and the extended 148-minute Japanese cinema release including a couple of extra scenes: a poignant scene of Yamamoto being ushered in to the Emperor’s presence to discuss the planned attack, and a comedy vignette of two galley cooks on one of the Japanese carriers where the elder one tries to explain to the younger stooge-character how their crossing the international dateline means they are now living through yesterday again.

The Blu-Ray also includes an impressive menu of extras. The most interesting is a 90-minute documentary backstory of the film, its ruinous budget and the problems between Fox and the ageing, paranoid Kurosawa (“in three weeks, he had filmed only eight minutes of unusable material”), how the special effects were done and critical reception of the film on its 1970 release. Additionally, there’s newsreel from 1941 and the documentary film ‘A Day of Infamy’. I also have the previous 136-minute DVD release in my collection, but the Blu-Ray beats it hands down for sharp image quality and as an overall viewing experience. Recommended unconditionally to anyone interested in the origins of America's entry into WW2, to action-movie fans and cinema buffs everywhere.
19 people found this helpful
robert carterReviewed in the United Kingdom on 09 May 2020
4.0 out of 5 stars
Seems likely to be much nearer the true story than other films. Worth a watch.
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A very good watchable film. You do have to watch mind because one side is speaking Japanese so you have to read the subtitles although subtitles in white when most of the conversation is between officers wearing white makes it challenging :).
Refreshing to see an American film where it depicts serious errors on the US side and many inept US officers and politicians and the disastrous effects of those decisions rather than the norm of 3 US Navy seals saving the day at the last minute albeit being a true depiction and the historical disastrous consequences that would be hard. Seems most likely to be far nearer a true depiction of probably what did happen in truth than other films on the subject. A very good film.
One person found this helpful
B. C. SwinbankReviewed in the United Kingdom on 27 July 2019
3.0 out of 5 stars
Stars for Blu-ray picture - could be better - not film
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I don't have a dvd copy so of this film I can't compare vs blu-ray, but if it is like the Sand Pebbles, which on dvd played on a blu ray machine, to me, gave a perfectly good result. In both films on blb-day the blue sky has a speckling effect - you have to look close, but it is there. I know there is a newer restored version in the USA - as well as the Sand Pebbles, which also has an isolated Jerry Goldsmith soundtrack. Not these versions - a few years ago Americans were saying we were getting the better dvd releases - now it is the USA with blu-ray.
The blu ray had the Japanese version which is a bit long and worth a watch - the 'comic scene' about crossing the timeline doesn't travel well - if you'll forgive me!
A great film at the end of the day. Trouble is I take the restored James Bond films as my bench mark these days.
LAWRENCE PHANReviewed in the United Kingdom on 17 June 2015
5.0 out of 5 stars
TORA TORA TORA. :- A FRESH REMASTER OF THE FILM
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THE FILM, WHICH IS ONE OF MY FAVOURITE FILMS, IN MOST WAYS DEPICTS ACCURATELY THE HISTORY OF THE BOMBING OF PEARL HARBOUR WITH AMERICA AS OPPOSED TO JAPANESE PERSPECTIVE.
INDEED, AS MOST AUDIENCES AND CRITICS MIGHT HAVE OBSERVED, THE FILM HAS A CERTAIN DOCUMENTARY FEEL TO IT.
THE ACTORS HAD BEEN CHOSEN BY THE DIRECTOR TO ACHIEVE THIS OBJECTIVE.
BESIDES THERE WAS A WEALTH OF DOCUMETARY FILMS ON THE HISTORY OF THE BOMBING ON PEARL HARBOUR AND ONE ON THE MAKING OF IT. THE MASTERING OF THE WHOLE FILM WAS EXCELLENT ESPECIALLY WHEN VIEWED IN THE PANASONIC BD 75 AND SONY LED EX 710 ALTHOUGH BOTH MACHINES ARE ONLY 2D CAPABLE. I MUST TAKE NOTE HERE THE ONE I BOUGHT IS NOT REGION B ENCODED AS ONE MIGHT HAVE BEEN LED TO BELIEVE BUT IT IS ENCODED WITH REGION A B C, WHICH MEANS BLU RAY PLAYERS WITH REGIONS A, B, OR C WOULD BE ABLE TO READ THIS DISC.
4 people found this helpful
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